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CHORI CURRENT News

2018

Research Study Correlates Obesity in Preschoolers with Screen Time and Sociodemographic Factors

Oakland, CA (March 5, 2018) – A new study by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland researcher Dr. June Tester, MD, MPH examined national data on preschool-aged children from 1999 to 2014 to highlight characteristics of children with the highest degree of obesity and found a strong correlation between the amount of “screen time” these children are exposed to and the likelihood of being severely obese. The study also found that preschoolers with severe obesity are also more likely to be of an ethnic or racial minority and to be living in poverty.

Click here to download the complete press release.
Click here to download the article in Pediatrics, March 2018

CHORI Study Suggests Human Antibody Structure May be Key to Improving Effectiveness of Meningococcal Vaccines

Oakland, CA  (February 16, 2018) - Research conducted by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI) scientists recently identified the molecular details of a human antibody raised by a vaccine for prevention of bacterial meningitis and sepsis. The study, “Crystal structure reveals vaccine elicited bactericidal human antibody targeting a conserved epitope on meningococcal FHbp,” by CHORI scientists Peter Beernink, PhD and the late
Alex Lucas, PhD, in collaboration with scientists at GlaxoSmithKline, recently was published in the journal Nature Communications. They report the crystal structure of a human antibody bound to a meningococcal serogroup B vaccine antigen known as Factor H binding protein. The research finding is the first example of a structure of a human antibody raised by vaccination bound to its target antigen.

Building on a previous study in which the scientists isolated human antibodies from single white blood cells shortly after vaccination with a meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, Dr. Beernink and colleagues obtained three-dimensional structures of a fragment of the antibody, alone and bound to the antigen. The antibody was of major interest because it bound to all natural variants of the antigen. This broad reactivity demonstrates that a human antibody raised by vaccination with a meningococcal B vaccine, may have the potential to contribute to broad protection against diverse strains of the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis - also known as meningococcus. The structure highlighted the difference between human and mouse antibodies to the antigen, which, in combination with other research being pursued at CHORI, will support the development of improved meningococcal B vaccines.

Click here to download the complete press release.
Click here to download the article in Nature Communications, February 6, 2018

 


Monday, March 12, 2018 10:31 AM

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